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Why I'm Thankful in 2007

November 26, 2007


Before we all become caught up in the hectic commercialism of "The Season," beginning with that most uniquely American holiday, Thanksgiving, I thought it would be useful to consider the things for which I am thankful.

First, I am thankful for a God who sent His Son to die for me, watches over me and my family and gives me what the Bible calls "a peace that passes all understanding." This was at the core of the first Thanksgiving celebration in Colonial America, as red men shared their bounty with white men, and early Americans gave thanks to Almighty God for the gift of life.

I am thankful for my bride of 38 years, a woman who has borne my troubles and my children, who has been a partner and a prayer warrior, a counselor and a friend. As always, I offered this year to purchase a ready-to-eat Thanksgiving dinner at the local supermarket, but she will not hear of it, preferring instead to rise early on that day to prepare the traditional home-cooked dinner for the family she loves.

I am thankful for my sons. Both of them grew up far too fast, and as they went out to make their own way in the world, they left behind a trail of memories for their mother and me. They will be here at our table with their own families on Thursday, and again at Christmas, and I will rejoice in their company and marvel at the gift they are to me.

This year I am especially thankful for grandchildren. With five of them now, my wife and I sometimes wish we could have skipped kids and gone directly to grandkids.

I am thankful for the warmth of a wonderful old home, filled with character and history, built by my wife's grandfather in February of 1915, on land that has been in her family since before the Civil War. Back when men were men and their women were thankful for it, the story goes that the frozen Nebraska topsoil had to be blasted open with dynamite and the basement dug out using a team of mules. Since then, the home has never been out of the family. In the corner of the living room sits an antique rocking chair with a similarly long family history. It came from my side of the family, and it has now rocked six generations of Pattons.

I am thankful for the people in my life who know me well and still find it in their hearts to love me. They include my family and my closest friends. As I once told one of my sons, when he was struggling with peer pressure in school, the people who love us will still be here long after the people we try so hard to impress have forgotten our names.

I am thankful for the Founding Fathers of the United States of America, who risked their lives, their fortunes and their sacred honor that I might be born in a free country. When I consider the odds of having been placed here in this nation at this moment in time, I cannot do the math. With so many millions of people in this world who live in political, economic or spiritual bondage, I am in awe of the blessing God has granted me.

I am thankful for the Declaration of Independence, which acknowledges that my rights come from God, not from man; and for the Constitution, which forms the basis for a system that maximizes economic opportunity by emphasizing liberty. Because it is a system implemented by fallible human beings, it will never be perfect, but it is the best anyone in this world will ever see.

I am thankful for a president who, though I sometimes disagree with him and despite having endured unprecedented partisan criticism, has had the courage to lead in this post-9/11 world, the wisdom to discern that the murder of 3,000 of our neighbors was but a warning, and the vision to proclaim "freedom is the right of every person and the future of every nation." History will no doubt be much kinder to him than we have been.

At this very special moment in our year, there is much for which to be thankful.

Copyright ©2007 Doug Patton

Doug Patton describes himself as a recovering political speechwriter who agrees with himself more often than not. His weekly columns are syndicated by Cagle Cartoons newspaper syndicate. Readers are encouraged to email him at dpatton@cagle.comand/or to follow him on Twitter at @Doug_Patton.

 


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